Adopt A Highway this weekend

Saturday , Nov 21, is the big day.

Please pick up your grabbers, vest and bags at the parking lot on Ramp 4, near the dumpsters. I will be there between 7:15 and 7:30 and would love to take a picture of everyone together. Please bring a mask for your photo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! to be politically correct

Wear long sleeve shirt and long pants. Boots would also be good.

Hope to see you.

Thanks

Carol Mowers

Blues Are Running Raffle Winner

 Congratulations!!   Arlene Rephan #8869 with help from daughter Amy Talhimer, accepting the "Blues are Running" painting. Good luck for a fast recovery from knee replacement and see you in the spring, maybe on the beach!

 Arlene Rephan Raffle Winner

Science Committee Report on Wildlife Nesting

Science Committee Report

Al Adam, Vice President # 13459

A much anticipated Science Committee Report has been prepared and presented by The American Ornithological Society Committee on Science Arbitration.

It is a comprehensive report evaluating the past and present management of beach-nesting wildlife species at the Cape Hatteras National Seashore Recreational Area. It contains 60 plus pages of data, charts and details about characteristics of various nesting birds and sea turtles, the things that likely influence their results and theories about other things that may influence their results.

Due to its size we have posted printed some of it in this newsletter but we have posted the entire report on our website for your review. Science Committee CAHA-report_final-AOS.pdf

I have only gotten into the first 17 pages of the report thus far and have developed a number of questions related to what I have seen to this point. Those questions, per Superintendent Hallac, may be presented to the authors, of which there are seven and two assistants. Some of my questions thus far are likely the results of my lack of familiarity with certain terms and others are as simple as wishing to know how some of the species target numbers may have been arrived upon. For instance the target for nesting pairs at Cape Point is 30, while the historical high is 15. As a career commissioned employee I was always aware of targets and the importance of keeping them realistic. We always wanted or needed more but kept in mind that goals should not be arbitrary....and I'm not saying these are, I just would like to understand their basis.

I would appreciate it if those of you who are interested who read the report and either solicit the authors for answers to any questions or send your questions to me and I will collect them and submit them in their entirety later this fall. I have little or no doubt that this information will come into play during any future reviews of access and resource protection concerns. One thing that is becoming apparent is that we will be trying to do more with less in many areas as erosion takes its toll on many areas of Hatteras and Ocracoke Islands.

Ocracoke Residents Need Help with Housing

A Home for the Holidays is seeking funds and/or help with shelter for residents of hurricane-stricken Ocracoke Island which struck September 6, 2019

It was the worst flooding in over 60 years!

Nearly 400 people (almost half the population) are displaced.

Many Ocracoke residents are still without a place to call home. 

Do you have or know of a travel trailer that can be donated? 

Consider a gift or money or a gently used travel trailer to an Ocracoke family.

Contact Maria Martinez

martinezart57@me.com / 252-216-6436

Air Down For Our Beaches

Air Down – Please Don’t Tear Up the Beaches

Bill Smith, President #7126 Life Member

Much has been written and said after this past summer season about the need to lower tire pressure before driving on the beach. The issue became one of this summer’s biggest, with over thirty cars being stuck one weekend day at Ramp 44 on Hatteras Island.

The need to “air down” before venturing out onto the sand remains an area of concern for both the National Park Service, as well as other drivers who have to deal with the challenges of multiple “stuck” vehicles in their path.

If you read comments online, there are many different opinions expressed but the opinion of most experienced beach drivers is that it is imperative that you lower tire pressure significantly before attempting drive on the sand, normally reducing air pressure to at least 20 pounds or below.

It seems one of the biggest deterrents to beach drivers failing to “air down” surrounds their questions of what do they do after they leave the beach. Many who come to the Outer Banks on vacation, as well as those who live here, keep their tires aired down for significant periods of time. They do not “air down” and “air up” each time they use the beach. Maintaining reasonable highway speeds, in the area of 40 to 45 mph does little to compromise a vehicle’s tires, certainly over a limited period of time.

If you choose to drive on the beach, one thing that should be done is to become familiar with tackle shops or other locations that provide air stations. Many of our NCBBA Weigh Stations, listed in this newsletter, provide free air. In Corolla, for example, there is a new air station in Corolla Park with six air pumps. Many stores or gas stations up and down the beaches provide free air such as The Blue Whale in Salvo, Askins Creek Store in Avon and the Oregon Inlet Fishing Center. Become familiar with the available air stations around areas of the beach you enjoy.

Please be courteous, failing to properly “air down” before entering the beach can create problems for other conscientious drivers, can make for an expensive afternoon, damage your driveline and lessen the enjoyment of all who use our beaches. Your vehicle may have oversized tires and be capable of traveling on the beach with full air pressure but there is a good chance that it will create ruts making it difficult for those who follow.

Suggested equipment for beach driving is a shovel, a tow strap, a jack and a board to place under it. An air gauge is mandatory and four-wheel drive (4WD), although not mandatory, is highly recommended. All-wheel drive (AWD) and low ground clearance vehicles frequently have problems on the beach. Beware brown sand and drop-offs.

We want everyone to enjoy the beach driving experience by being properly prepared. As NCBBA members, let’s be the ambassadors out on the beach, setting the proper example for others by “airing down” before we head out.

For your convenience, we have listed  Weigh Stations who have air.. 

Weigh Stations With Air

AVON - Frank & Fran's

BUXTON - Dillon's Corner 

FRISCO - Frisco Rod and Gun

HATTERAS - Teach's Lair

OCRACOKE - Tradewinds Tackle Shop